Assessment

When designing assessments, it is important to be clear about what your intention is. First, are you assessing for budget purposes (this program was successful because we reached x students/faculty/staff), or philosophical purposes (this program was successful because our participants were engaged, had meaningful conversations, and reported satisfaction with their experience).

 

Questions to consider:

  1. What are you assessing? What numbers or qualitative data will be of interest to you?
  2. Do you need numbers to justify budget requests? If so, what numbers would be most persuasive to a funding body?
  3. What do you as the founder/facilitator of this group need to know in order to improve the next iteration? What feedback would help shape the next round?
  4. What format will your assessment take: paper, digital, verbal, etc? Is your form scalable or is it specific to this iteration? How would you adapt this for future iterations?
  5. How do you plan to store your data, and will participant identity be protected and/or anonymous?

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Book Clubs in Academic Libraries: A Case Study and Toolkit by Johanna Jacobsen Kiciman and Alaina C. Bull is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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